Inspirational Quotes by African American Men & Women of Power, Film, Music, Sports & Life

photo above courtesy of pinterest (black women art)

Well as Black History Month comes to a close tomorrow, I thought I’d end the month by giving back a little inspiration that will help fuel your passion, goals, career and life. I personally am a lover of quotes, if I could put a different quote up in every area of my home, I definitely would ( and still may do one day 😉 ❤️ )

Quotes are very poignant as well as powerful. A simple word or saying such as a quote can be the perfect start to moving forward or a great way for you to keep track of your goals, validate who you are and why you’re so awesome. Because you really are! 🤩 ⭐

Let these quotes inspire you to be the best you were created to be, it doesn’t matter what color you are or what background you may have come from – All of us were created for greatness! Feel free to save the quotes below and share them on your own social sites, so others can be inspired as well.

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These were just a few of the many, many quotes spoken by some past and present African Americans, did any of the quotes stand out to you? Do you have a quote by a notable African American leader that you love? Sound off in the comments!

As this month comes to a close, let’s remember those whom paved the way for us to have the freedom to make certain choices today….

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Roshonda N. Blackmon – Creator of A Blog, A Magazine. It’s JustsumInspiration, Author, Speaker & Encourager

 

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My History, Your History. Black History Facts, You Might Didn’t Know About!

 

Clara B Williams
You can check out more of this story here 

As we continue to celebrate BMH (Black History Month), I thought I’d share a couple of facts that I bet you didn’t know about some notable African-Americans whom made history. There were many, many African-Americans whom’s talents and contributions were well known such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, a social activist and baptist minister whom played a huge role in the civil rights movement in which he lead peaceful protest to make sure African Americans get the right to vote and be treated as an equal.

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 

His “I have a dream speech” is known as one of the best speeches of our nation and has been quoted numerous times – Kings speech of equality has touched many lives and while some things have changed, we still have quite a ways to go before his dream will be fully a dream come true.

So, while King is a popular name among-st the nation, there are other African Americans whom helped lend a helping hand in shaping this country as well. While there are over 100 facts about African American History you may or may not have known, listed below are 15 facts (including one above) that I personally didn’t even know about, except for the last one of course 😉 ☺️

Check them out below: 

DidYouKnow

 

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Carter G. Woodson organized the first Negro History Week Celebration on the second week of February in 1926. The week celebration eventually became a month long celebration which is now known as Black History Month

Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglas

February was chosen as Black History Month because two important birthdays occur in
February—that of Abraham Lincoln, the author of the Emancipation Proclamation, and that of Frederick Douglass, an early African American abolitionist

Andrew Rube Foster

Andrew “Rube” Foster organized the Negro National League, the first Black baseball
league, in 1920. The first independent Black professional baseball team was the Cuban
Giants, formed in 1885.

Marie Brittan

Marie V. Brittan Brown, a female African American inventor, designed a security system which was patented on December 2, 1969. The “Closed Circuit Television Security”  system created by Brown was intended to help people guarantee their own security until the police arrived.

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Sophia Packard and Harriet Giles, the founders of Spelman College, used just $100 to
found this Historically Black College. Miss Sophie Packard died in 1891.  Miss Hattie Giles took over the role of Seminary President until her own death in 1910. But that time, Spelman had become the largest Black women’s seminary in the world. Today it is known as Spelman College.

Jordan Nixon Impeachment

In 1954, with Barbara Jordan as the leader, the all-Black Texas Southern University
debate team stunned and beat the Harvard debate team. After unsuccessful bids in 1962 and 1964, Jordan ran and won a seat in the Texas House of Representatives in 1966, and she became the first African American person since 1883 to serve in the Texas Senate. In 1972 Jordan was elected to represent Texas’ Eighteenth District in the House of Representatives.

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The U.S. Capitol and the White House were both constructed with the help of free
Blacks and slaves, working alongside white laborers and craftsmen. This story was also spoken of by Michelle Obama during the 2016 Democratic National Convention speech.

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Benjamin Bradley, a slave, was employed at a printing office and later at the Annapolis
Naval Academy. In the 1840s he developed a steam engine for a war ship. Unable to
patent his work due to the fact of him being a slave; he sold the patent and used the proceeds to purchase his freedom.

Frank Wills

When Frank Wills, a 24-year-old security guard at the Watergate office complex in Washington DC, noticed a piece of duct tape on a door lock while doing his rounds, he could not have imagined that he was about to unearth a political scandal that would bring down a United States President. Frank Wills, a Black security guard, discovered President Nixon’s cover-up which later caused his resignation as President of the United States. Despite Wills’ discovery he struggled to find work for the rest of his life.

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Estine Cowner, a former waitress;  became a scaler on a construction crew at the Kaiser shipyards in Richmond, CA, to construct the Liberty ship George Washington Carver. The demand for qualified labor in WWII opened up new opportunities for Black women.

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The term “dreadlocks” came from a movement of guerrilla warriors who vowed not to cut their hair until Haile Selassie, former Emperor of Ethiopia was released from exile after leading the resistance against the Italian invasion. The warriors hair became matted and began to lock over time. Because the warriors with locks in their head were “dreaded” the term “dreadlocks” came to fruition.

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Being able to buy fresh food from your local supermarket, wouldn’t have happened had it not been for an African American inventor named Frederick McKinley Jones. Jones invented the air-cooling units used in food transporting trucks in the 1930s, and was awarded more than 60 patents over the course of his life, 40 of which involved refrigeration equipment.

Selma Burke

Selma Burke was an American sculptor and a member of the Harlem Renaissance movement whom described herself as “a people’s sculptor.” Burke created many pieces of public art and prominent African-American figures like Duke Ellington, Mary McLeod Bethune and Booker T. Washington.

AND, LAST BUT DEFINITELY NOT LEAST!

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Former President Barack Obama made history by becoming the first African American to become president of the United States. The 44th president, served a total of 8 years in office; getting elected to a second term in 2013.  During his term, Obama signed many landmark bills into law including “Obamacare” a.k.a the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Did any of these facts surprise you? Did you know any of them? Do you have an African American fact to share? If so, sound off in the comments!!

You can find more African-American trendsetters and how they shaped the African American Culture  👉 👉……. here 

knowledge_is_power

 

Roshonda N. Blackmon – Creator of A Blog, A Magazine. It’s JustsumInspiration, Author, Speaker & Encourager

 

10 Black Movie Classics You Must See or Re-watch for Black History Month

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Black History Month is here and while the month is short and will be over before you know it, it’s a month where African-Americans of times past and present are honored for their sacrifices, achievements and accomplishments marked throughout history. It’s a time for us to reflect on that rich history and celebrate the lives of the ones lost and present whom paved the way for generations of other African Americans to walk in freedom and while this movement is still a “work in progress” for the most part, we’re proud that they stood fearlessly in the face of adversity to make sure we have some of the luxuries we have today such as the right to vote.

One way to honor and look back on African-American culture, history, activists and the actors that played them or played parts representing such troubling times is by way of a movie. I personally love watching movies, especially the ones that portray the African-American men and women whom did so much for us. So, if you just happen to have a down day this month and want to celebrate the occasion, listed below are 10 Classic movies portrayed by African-Americans that you should watch in honor of Black History Month. In no particular order they are:

‘Purple Rain’

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What better way to celebrate black history and the life of late-great music legend Prince. The musical drama features some of Prince’s most iconic songs and killer outfits.

‘Malcolm X’

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‘Malcolm X’ is was Spike Lee classic, portrayed by Denzel Washington. The movie chronicled the life of the civil rights hero.

‘Selma’

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Ava DuVernay made history with ‘Selma’ in 2014, becoming the first black woman to have her film nominated for “Best Picture” at the Oscars. ‘Selma’ is a portrait piece of Dr. Martin Luther King as he led the march from Selma to Montgomery for voting rights.

‘Glory’

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Free black men were conscripted to fight in the Union Army during the Civil War, but as this 1989 period drama shows, not even their willingness to sacrifice their lives for their country was enough to shield them from racism and segregation. Denzel Washington stars in the role that would nab him his first Oscar.

‘Barry’

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‘Barry’ is one of two drama films (of what will surely be many) that take a glimpse at the life of a younger former President Barack Obama, the man who would one day become the first black president of the United States.

‘The Princess & the Frog’

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In 2009, Disney made history by featuring its first ever African-American princess. Anika Noni-Rose portrayed princess Tiana in this film. It’s a beautiful film in which is sure to inspire little girls of all diverse backgrounds that she too can be “A Princess”

‘The Color Purple’

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Okay, so there’s really nothing to say about this one but – CLASSIC!!! – No matter how many times I’ve seen this movie – I always need my tissues….

‘The Wiz’

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‘The Wiz’ in which stars Diana Ross and a very young Michael Jackson is the black version of ‘The Wizard of Oz’ story.

‘Carmen Jones’

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Dorothy Dandridge became the first black woman to be nominated for a Best Actress award at the 1954 Oscars for her role in this epic musical, based on Bizet’s tragic opera ‘Carmen.’

‘A Raisin in the Sun’

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Starring Ruby Dee and Sidney Poitier, this 1961 adaptation of Lorraine Hansberry‘s play is a film about an African-American family search for the American Dream and what happens when that dream is derailed. While the older version is a true classic, the newer 2008 version in which stars Sean Combs (a.k.a P. Diddy), Sanaa Lathan, Audra McDonald & Phylicia Rashad are performances in which you wouldn’t want to miss.

These movies are sure to give you a dose of the richness of the African-American culture and a sense of why we should celebrate this month each year. We’re not just celebrating the culture but we’re acknowledging the people whom broke barriers in every arena which makes us glad to be a part of such an amazing history. You can find other classics listed here. Did your favorite make the list? If not, then what African American movie(s) are your favorite classics? Let me know in the comments.

 

Roshonda N. Blackmon – Creator of A Blog, A Magazine. It’s JustsumInspiration, Author, Speaker & Encourager